Saturday, January 31, 2015

Yay!!! We made the Top 10 in the world in....Oh freckenswine, nevermind.

We need to talk. (Ioe, you, me, and our corned beef)
And its not about climate change or the economy....it is this:

10 Most Obese Nations (%)


American Samoa 74.6
Nauru 71.1
Cook Islands 63.4
Tokelau 63.4
Tonga 57.6
Samoa 54.1
Palau 48.9
Kiribati 46
Marshall Isalnds 45.4
Kuwait 42

Let's face it, we have a big problem.


....and before you get defensive and say BMI measurements aren't fair and all that, ....get this, 
WE ARE GETTING FATTER, DYING EARLIER, GETTING SICKER, AND FAILING TO LIVE OUT OUR LIVES BECAUSE WE ARE EATING OURSELVES TO DEATH.

Okay - so I am no saint, being the God fearing, mamoe eating, mayonnaise loving islander that I really am, but my goodness, this calls for a major wake up (from our sunday afternoon snooze after to'ona'i of povi masima.

- It reminds me of working for a health provider and we visited churches to run demonstrations and do cooking classes with the aulotu - we would measure the fat content of pisupo, learn to read labels on cans, and do an exercise session.
At the end of EACH of the sessions, we were invited to sit down and have a meal with the church leaders....the food was always always the same......lololo.com 

What is very sad where I live is the number of small Pacific children who are obese. 

It's just so tragic ---- and sad, to see a little child having a poor start in life and who will grow to emulate and learn from those they love, and an unhealthy relationship with food. Aue.

It's all so sad and frustrating. 

Why do we get fat faster?
1. We enjoy eating. 
2. The food we enjoy eating is higher in fat, carbohydrates and sugary content.
3, Our societal setup revolves around community and being together and sharing. When this happens, we eat. 
4. We are big fakkas anyway, so eating is err, what we like to do to sustain our big frames.
5. Being fat has become the norm (and no fucken kidding, I mean, imagine being a slim American Samoan (74.6% of the population are obese )...I bet they would feel left out!
6. Exercise is not part of our daily lives on the most part. There's exceptions of course, case in point: Le Mamea Sefulu Ioane who walks every morning, and Tuiatua Tupua Tamasese who walks a lot. And the marathon gentlemen. And Koko from my village.
7. We have a learned culture of 'bigger is better" ---the more food you give, the more generous and loving you are. The more pigs you kill for your church building's faaulufalega, the more blessings ye shall receive.
8. We were introduced to bad foods by parangs and then we have continued to eat these food long after we became independent.
9. We don't have enough role models who are healthy and fit.
and last but definitely not the least:
10. Many of us, including our leaders, do not recognize that we have a problem. We don't realize the enormity of this 'tragedy' because we are so busy worrying about climate change. Poverty. And our next plate of fried chicken and taro with coconut cream.


Coconut Oil Phenomena
In the last few years, virgin coconut oil has become this so called super food, celebrated all over the world. 
Coconuts which are falling onto the overgrown plantations all over the place.
Every island in the Pacific celebrates the coconut tree - considered the tree of life for its many uses,....but now, we harvest and bottle this now into pretty jars destined for a first world country to be sold for seven times the price (case in point, coconut yogurt in Christchurch).
And are "we" making the most of these amazing natural foods available to us? Nope.
Tracy Berno of Lincoln and Robert Oliver,(chef) are doing something amazing in this area - promoting the use of local produce in the Pacific.

E toe fa'aauau pea.(To be Continued).

eh, ia ua lava ga kala ae se'i o'u alu e ai sa'u falai moa lale ua vela mai.

malo le eva,.







1 comment:

Enid Westerlund said...

Haha..and I just finished stuffing my face with pisupo over lunch! Oh but I have lost 6kgs over 7 weeks..does that count?